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13 February 2010 @ 03:47 pm
Dead artists and a dying man.  
Today my Mom took me up from Laguna Woods to Brentwood so we could visit the Getty Center. I had hoped we could go to the Getty Villa because that's where all the Greek/Etruscan/Roman art is, but I'll take what I can get! The Getty Center's Museum does have art from the Medieval Ages through the Modern period, plus there's several beautiful gardens, so there's plenty to see.
I'm just a whiner, I guess.

Anyway, so spent several hours there. The current exhibition is 'Rembrandt & His Pupils' which features many of the drawings Rembrandt did contrasted with the sketches of similar subjects made by his pupils. Often, the Old Master and students would draw the exact same model at the same time, so it was interesting to puzzle out what changes were made by each artist and why. Unfortunately, little 8" x 10" sketches are hard to appreciate from the distance, and the museum was so crowded with Saturday afternoon visitors that it was really difficult to look at things up close. I eventually just gave up and wanted to find a different gallery with less crowds to explore.

Unfortunately, Saturday afternoon at one of the world's most popular art museums meant that there were very few rooms that weren't teeming with people. The galleries for the 14th and19th centuries were especially congested. The rooms that had less people, like the Dutch Masters landscapes, were topics that I really could care less about. (Landscapes = SO DULL!) Oh well. Mom also has a much shorter attention span for art museums than I do - I mean, she'll look at the art, but I want to study it. I want to read those little history plaques beside the painting, study the brush strokes, and think about the composition...in the time it takes me to look at 2-3 panels in a Medieval gallery Mom is done with the room. So I always felt rushed. To be honest, the visit wasn't much fun.

--

When we got back in the evening, we went to church. The sermon was a patriotic one that tied together the Christian nation and the American nation, comparing and contrasting different rules and facts about them. I wish I could say I paid attention, but the pastor was long-winded and eventually I tuned out. (That was naughty of me, I know.) Towards the end the pastor made a big announcement about how this was probably Grandville's (my grandfather) last church service and he was so happy to have his family with him and they would very much miss him and his stories. That was...unusual, I guess. Maybe it felt weird because my church is so big that the pastor doesn't know me.

But that turned into the theme of the night. Grandpa was in a melancholy mood, and kept bringing up things like "This is my last church service, it's such an ordeal to go" because he has to take his caretaker and his oxygen and it just wipes him up. I mean, totally understandable that he can't go anymore, but it was just a surprise that he kept bringing it up because he rarely complains. His stories rambled a little more than usual, but he always tried to bring them to a neat close with a moral at the end. I guess, all in all, there was a great sense that he was 'wrapping up' as much as possible.
Most awkward moment? His closing sentence for the evening:
"The most beautiful woman I ever saw was your grandmother with no clothes on. I never felt the need for strip clubs or things of that nature."
Really not a mental image I wanted, and a really bizarre choice as your family is preparing to leave.
 
 
 
Min: Leverage/HardisonLetterToYourMommaphantomminuet on February 19th, 2010 12:29 am (UTC)
It is the prerogative of grandparents to dote on their grandchildren and then to embarass the bejeebers out of them. :-)
Suzik00kaburra on February 19th, 2010 01:09 am (UTC)
Too true!
Mr Bagginsmrbaggins1 on February 19th, 2010 09:27 am (UTC)
I think it's a great closing sentence
I'll rather go out to meet the grim reaper (or Elvis?) thinking about all the women I loved than anything else.

But it's very sad to see the old ones fade away. My heartgirl's mother is 89 and a constant worry. She's currently in hospital with as her blood pressure is out of control