?

Log in

No account? Create an account
 
 
14 June 2010 @ 05:24 pm
Technical difficulties in mythology class = more time to prepare for final  
So it's 1:45, in my Mythology and Folklore class during the final week of classes.
(I was ten-fifteen minutes late to class. Oops.)

My group is scheduled to present our analysis of Derek Zoolander's Hero Journey. (Thank you, Ben Stiller and Joseph Campbell for making our final project possible.)   We're third.  The first group has just finished their presentation about Harry Potter.  They're trying to show the class a film clip they made with puppets, but it isn't working.  Suddenly, the computer stops connecting to the projector, effectively killing any presentations that need a computer to run, say, a Powerpoint presentation. 
This would have not been a problem in the first year or two that I was in college, when Powerpoint was still new technology.  Now, though, everything is done with Powerpoint.  It's inconceivable that a student would do a professional presentation without it.  I kind of hate this fact about American collegiate life.
So we're all sitting around in the classroom, waiting for one of DeAnza's tech guys to come save the day by fixing the computer...except he doesn't show.  The teacher tries to lecture a little, but she's basically done with lessons so she hasn't got much to teach.  We review a few characters from myths we discussed earlier in the quarter, and then all thirty-plus of us sit around staring at the wall.

FINALLY, a group that doesn't have a Powerpoint presentation admits their inadequate preparation and go to the front of the classroom to present their project.  If you ever have trouble sleeping, listening to someone describe their analysis of Ozymandias from The Watchmen by regurgitating vast quantities of text, with absolutely no visual aids, is a great way to fix your insomnia.  (I take that back; we did have the projection of the text they were reading.  Literally, black words on a white piece of paper.  Shoot me.) I mean, how many ways can you rehash the same set of events?  At one point, a guy had his notes posted on the projector so we could see them - not only did he spell the name of Ozymandias incorrectly, he had grammar and spelling mistakes a-plenty and referred to Ozy as a 'douche' with a 'cat lion animal thing' for a companion.  I know the class is a bit of a joke, but could you at least pretend to take it seriously?

Anyway.  So long story short, the tech guy who got sent out couldn't even fix the problem with the computer, so we didn't have to do our presentation today.  This is really great, because we hadn't actually practiced it as a group, and we didn't know who would read what or if our presentation was even long enough.  We're meeting tomorrow to finish polishing the project up.