?

Log in

No account? Create an account
 
 
28 July 2012 @ 04:49 pm
London Olympics 2012  
Last night I was looking forward to watching the Olympics' Opening Ceremony, because I was really curious how the British would follow up Beijing's stunning display. I'd also heard that Paul McCartney would be closing the ceremony, and there's nothing cooler than an ex-Beatle. Unfortunately, somewhere between 'Angora' and 'Argentina' in the Parade of Nations I got a splitting headache, so I didn't make it through to Sir Beatle's rendition of "Hey Jude". Tears.

I have to admit, I wasn't all that impressed with the British opening. The opening of a rural community running around their farms with sheep and whatnot was...odd, but not nearly as weird as the abandonment of agrarian culture for industrial enlightenment via interpretative dance. But fine, interpretative dance is a tradition nearly as old as the Olympics, so I'll live with it.

Was the Olympic ring meant to recall the Tolkien "One ring to rule them all"? That's instantly what I thought of as the hundreds of extras labored to forge a gigantic metal ring at the center of the stage. It totally recalled to me the Ents and those scenes of industrial distruction in Jackson's Lord of the Rings films. Plus, Tolkien's a giant of British literature. It would seem natural to include a reference to him!

I wish I had been there in the stadium, though, because NBC's nonsensical editing made the transition from industry to James Bond extremely sudden. I hope it somehow made sense in the context of the overall show.

So Daniel Craig/James Bond is sent to fetch the Queen of England in a helicopter and bring her to the games. Sure, why not? Queen Elizabeth II jumps out of said helicopter and parachutes into Olympic Stadium? Yeah. She's only in her mid-80s, so that's totally plausible. It was a little refreshing to see her take part in such a silly joke; who knew the old gal had a sense of humor?

From Craig we transition into a bizarre celebration of the National Health Service. Now, I'm not arguing against nationalized medicine because I think that it's not a bad idea, but it seemed a very odd choice for this world stage. Granted, I liked that the segment was also a celebration of children's literature, a genre that really did flower in the British Isles. (Thanks to the likes of Barrie and Rowling; am I the only one disappointed that there wasn't a shout out to Roald Dahl?) The giant balloon villains were great fun. Captain Hook, Voldermort, and the Queen of Hearts - great choices as representatives of British villainy. But Cruella de Vil? Really? I mean, I love her and all but I would rate her a second or third-level villainess at best. But when the flock of Mary Poppinses floated down to do battle, I was a happy child again. Best segment by far.


Then there was this weird ten minutes that celebrated the British contribution to 20th century music. That's fine - great even. What didn't work was that this was ostentatiously structured around a story of a boy and a girl falling in love via cell phone. That was just blatant product placement and it really didn't work for me at all.

Speaking of product placement, Mr. Bean also rocked out on a cell phone while performing the great musical classic "Chariots of Fire". It was that kind of night.

Congrats to David Beckham for rocking that boat down the Thames. Definitely the highlight of the evening right there.



Olympic fire raining down on an abstract map of London
I think that's called 'symbolism'.
Tags:
 
 
 
jill_dragon: The Hobbitjill_dragon on July 29th, 2012 06:44 am (UTC)
I think the forged metal Olympic ring was meant to recall the Industrial Revolution. Still I can't be the only one who thought of the Scouring of the Shire with that sequence. :D

It makes sense as Tolkien drew his inspiration for that and Mordor, Isengard, etc, from the industrialization of the English countryside that he witnessed.
Muse's Books: hobbitmuse_books on July 29th, 2012 09:29 pm (UTC)
Tolkien grew up in rural Warwickshire on the borders of Birmingham, which is famous for those 'dark, satanic mills' that were springing up during Dickens time.

Indeed, friends often refer to Birmingham as Mordor.

I feel the ceremony with the replica of Glastonbury Tor with oak tree rather than church tower also did have some LotR - someone pointed out that the rising of the flame at the end was a bit 'Eye of Sauron' as well.
LiveJournal: pingback_botlivejournal on July 29th, 2012 06:44 pm (UTC)
Discussion Question: London Olympics & Children's Authors
User fashion_piranha referenced to your post from Discussion Question: London Olympics & Children's Authors saying: [...] put on for the rest of the world. I rambled a bit about the opening ceremony over in my other blog, [...]